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Exploring the World of Spice and Smoke
Tags >> books

Ask Chef Mike: Grilling with Wood Planks

Posted by: Lois Manno

Tagged in: smoking , new content , grilling , books


Q: How do you use wood planks for grilling?

A: Wood planks add another dimension to smoke-cooking. It's the most fun you can have with smoke—without breaking the law! Read more on the Burn! Blog here.


Popular Plates Fiery Foods CoverOn June 28th, my latest publication, entitled “Popular Plates: Fiery Foods” will hit all the major newsstands in the U.S., including Barnes & Noble, Home Depot, Borders, Costco–all the big box stores.  The publisher, Source Interlink Media is printing 200,000 copies, which is by far the largest print run of any of my publications.  Essentially, this is a book in magazine format that traces the history of spicy foods from the first chile peppers in the Americas to how we cook with them today.  This bookazine makes a great gift for the chilehead in the family, or a friend who wants to get started eating the hot stuff.  There are 80 recipes from all over the world from basic to advanced, plus many photos and illustrations.  I certainly hope everyone enjoys it!


Latest dispatch from the Burn! Blog...

Wine Pairing App on iPhoneHave you ever stood in the wine section at your local grocery store or Costco and felt completely and utterly lost, unsure of which bottle is the right one for you? Finally, you no longer have to be a sommelier to buy wine like one!

A free mobile application is taking the guesswork out of finding and purchasing wine. The new Natalie MacLean Wine Picks & Pairings app lets you use your smartphone camera to snap a picture of any bottle label bar code in the liquor store. With one click, you can get tasting notes, scores, and food pairings.

“You’re in the wine shop wondering if you should buy the bottle with the castle on its label or the one with the fluffy squirrel,” says Natalie MacLean, the editor of one of the largest wine web sites at www.nataliemaclean.com. She created the tool to make buying wine easier for consumers. “Now you just point and click to find out if that pinot noir actually is a good wine to go with [tomorrow night’s dinner]. No more guesswork based on castles and critters.”

You can scan the wines right in front of you at the store. The app’s key features allow you to:

- Instantly access tasting notes, scores, prices, recipes and food pairings
- Search 150,000 wines at liquor stores across the country
- Track your purchases in your virtual cellar with just a few clicks
- Create a wine journal with your own wine notes and pictures in the app
- Share your wines and pairings on Twitter and Facebook

The app, designed by Fluid Trends, bundles a suite of 10 wine apps including reviews, cellar journals, recipes, food pairings, articles, blog posts, a wine glossary, a bi-weekly newsletter, a Natalie MacLeandirectory of wineries around the world and excerpts from Natalie’s bestselling book Red, White and Drunk All Over as well as her new book out this fall Unquenchable: A Tipsy Quest for the World’s Best Bargain Wines.

A certified sommelier and winner of the World’s Best Wine Writer award at the World Food Media Awards, Natalie wrote and vetted all the pairings and wine reviews in the app rather than relying on computer-generated algorithms and crowd-sourced material. She is the only person to have won both the M.F.K. Fisher Distinguished Writing Award from the James Beard Foundation and the M.F.K. Fisher Award for Excellence in Culinary Writing from Les Dames d’Escoffier International, but to amateur wine lovers everywhere, she’s a hero.

Cheers to that!

Download the free  app for iPod Touch or iPhone on iTunes. For BlackBerry, visit App World. For Droid, Nexus One, Nokia, Windows 7 and other smartphones, use the mobilized web site here.


Dave with Flaming HabaneroThe 23rd annual show, beloved by foodies in the Southwest and elsewhere, takes place at the lovely Sandia Resort and Casino at the Tramway exit of I-25 north of Albuquerque.  For the fifth year in a row, the show is sold out of exhibitor space.  This year, we have a record number of trade buyers attending, and will feature the following highlights.

 

 


Burn! Masthead


The launch of Burn! digital monthly magazine.
  Get your free first copy at the Burn! booth, number 417.

Disc-It UnitThe Great Disc-It Giveaway.  Nevin of Disc-It made 3 fiery foods themed Disc-Its, and you can register at their booths, 107 & 109.

Pace LogoThe Pace Chef's Challenge, featuring three Albuquerque chefs vying for the "best dish made with a Pace brand of salsa."  It happens at 2 pm each day in the rotunda area at the east end of the main lobby.



Eat More Heat LogoEat More Heat Live.  Broadcasting live from the show on Stickam.com during show hours Saturday and Sunday.  Next the the El Pinto booth in the main lobby.

1001 CoverBook Signings.
  I'll be signing copies of my three latest books in the Rio Grande Books booth (315), each day at 3pm.

The doors open to the general public at 4 pm Friday.  See you at the show!  Complete show information is here.


The Digital Cookbook Revolution

Posted by: Kelli Bergthold

Tagged in: TV , games , food trends , entertainment , business trends , books

Online Recipes

Can’t decide what to make for dinner tonight? Having trouble with your pizza dough technique? Gone are the days of rifling through a library of cookbooks to find the best tiramisu recipe or the perfectly sized meal for a party of one. The next generation of food documentation is here, and it’s streaming online 24/7.

Last December, YouTube announced the most popular cooking videos of 2010. Among them, viewers can learn what goes into a jalapeño POP burger and how to carve a potato ball in a potato box.

Scarlett Lindeman from the Atlantic explains it best in her recent article:

“[E]ven the most well-stocked library cannot undermine the speed and expanse of the Internet. Cooks curious about a particular technique can click through YouTube archives as if turning the pages of a well-thumbed French Laundry cookbook. I know many who do and then pass them around via e-mail and Facebook. Cutline Communications, a consumer technology PR company, has noted that ‘more Americans are turning to YouTube to learn how to prepare all kinds of foods.’”

Embedded videos from sites such as YouTube aren’t the only forms of new cooking media. Throwing its weight into the arena are video games dedicated to the art of cooking. Games like the popular Diner Dash and Iron Chef America: Supreme Cuisine, are teaching tech-savvy cooks how to filet a fish and julienne an onion from the comfort of their game consoles. Smartphones have also joined the fray, and you can now access thousands of recipes from your iPhone or Android mobile device.

While there’s something inherently charming about a thirty-year-old edition of Mastering The Art of French Cooking, or a well-used, sauce-splattered edition of 1,001 Best Hot and Spicy Recipes, digital media is on its way to making the art of cooking accessible to anyone, anywhere, anytime.

See the full collection of top cooking videos on The Huffington Post.


2011 Brings Media Expansion for Us

Posted by: Dave DeWitt

 

Burn! LogoHere at Sunbelt Shows, the SuperSite's parent company, we are really looking forward to the coming year because of the new media projects we're launching—a digital magazine and a book publishing division. We owe it all to technological advancements that now make it easier than ever to publish digital products, so we're proud to announce Burn! digital magazine, and digital books through Sunbelt Media, our book division. But Sunbelt Media will also have printed books, because we are not abandoning a very popular medium that's been around for 600 years or so.

In the next year, look for chilehead and BBQ books from me and from other writers on our team, Sunbelt Media Logoincluding a facsimile release of the original Callaloo, Calypso & Carnival: The Cuisines of Trinidad & Tobago, first published in 1993; The Hot Sauce Bible: New Testament; and The Vegetarian Chilehead, a large collection of spicy meatless recipes. Hopefully, we will be able to complete Barbecue Apocalypse: Spiced-Up Q with an Attitude, but that might have to wait until 2012.  Burn! digital magazine, a subscription-based monthly, will absolutely blow your mind! Read all about it here.  And cheers to a wonderful 2011!



Founding Foodies a Hit with Reviewers

Posted by: Dave DeWitt

Tagged in: history , books

Cover of The Founding FoodiesI'm pleased to note that my latest book, The Founding Foodies, is getting good reviews.  Here's a sampling:

“You've put together a wonderfully detailed and rollicking culinary tale. It's one I will look forward to sharing with friends. I love your excursions into the English figuring out what to eat, Valley Forge myths, the importance of the salt industry, and the importance of fishing in the new Republic. Cool stuff woven into a compelling narrative.” —Leni A. Sorensen, Ph.D., African-American Research Historian, Monticello

"This book wholly represents the culinary traditions and passions of important historical figures like Thomas Jefferson – a true scholar and gastronome. It is a fascinating tale of how our nation’s third president elegantly married French and American cookery. Thomas Jefferson and the Founding Foodies is sure to enlighten and entertain everyone from historians to home cooks."  —Walter Staib, Chef/Proprietor, City Tavern Restaurant, Philadelphia, and star and host of the PBS series, "A Taste of History"

"A deft combination of primary-source material, historical context, entertaining tidbits, and authentic recipes, this highly readable piece of popular history is sure to have wide appeal." —Neil Derksen, Library Journal

This would make a great Christmas present for your foodie friends, and you can order a copy here.


New DD Books Published

Posted by: Dave DeWitt

Tagged in: history , fiery foods , entertainment , books

1001 Best CoverI'm pleased to announce the publication of two new books of mine.  The first, 1001 Best Hot & Spicy Recipes, is a compilation assembled from my rather large recipe archives.  I went through them and selected what I considered to be the best and most representative recipes from all cultures that like to spice up their foods with chiles.  Together with last year's The Complete Chile Pepper Book, these are all you would need to be certified an official chilehead.  I submitted a total of 1059 recipes just to be sure there were enough!  You can order the book at a discount from Amazon, here.

The next book is one that I'm really proud of.  For the second time (after Da Vinci's Kitchen), I abandoned writing about chiles and hot and spicy to try my hand at food Founding Foodies Coverhistory.  Because I graduated from the University of Virginia ("Mr. Jefferson's academical village"), I've always been a fan of Thomas Jefferson, and when I started researching his farming and gardening, that led me to George Washington (a better farmer, actually) and Benjamin Franklin, one of the more famous early American food lovers.  After three and a half years of research and writing, I completed The Founding Foodies: How Washington, Jefferson, and Franklin Revolutionized American Cuisine.  My agent, Scott Mendel, believes that it is one of my best books ever, and I take that a step further:  I think it's the best book I've ever written.  It's not scheduled for release until November 1, but you can pre-order it at Amazon, here.  You will not be disappointed, I promise.  Early American cuisine was surprisingly sophisticated, and both Washington and Jefferson grew chile peppers in their gardens.  Everyone loved barbecue back in those days--when it was mostly a political event featuring smoked ox or whole hogs, plus, of course, a great amount of beer and whiskey.  For more information and some excerpts from the book, see my founding foodies website, here.


Food Books That Make You Think

Posted by: Dave DeWitt

Tagged in: smoking , science , history , entertainment , books

Savage Barbecue, by Andrew WarnesFood history is a relatively new scholarly discipline, going back onlyCatching Fire, by Richard Wrangham about thirty years.  It evolved from two seemingly disparate human endeavors, cooking and recording general history.  The late food historian Karen Hess observed in 1981: “Few scholars are cooks—and fewer cooks scholars. Perhaps this accounts for the fact that no other aspect of human endeavor has been so neglected by historians as home cooking.” And not only has home cooking been neglected as a subject for historians, so have the history of food ingredients, inns and restaurants, food philosophy, and food in culture—until the last three decades.

Before then, accounts of culinary subjects were “regarded as relevant only to a kind of anthropology of ceremony,” in the words of Paul Freedman, editor of Food: The History of Taste. He goes on to point out that the history of cuisine had been viewed as part of the history of fashion, “hence of frivolity.” In other words, not a serious subject for a historian to explore.  But how that has changed!  The turning point seems to be the publication of Food in History by Reay Tannahill in 1973. It was a bestseller then and is still in print and in the revised and expanded edition published in 1988, Tannahill commented: “When the idea of Food in History first occurred to me, I was mystified by the fact that no one had already written such a book.” Indeed, The New York Times book reviewer observed: “Here at last is what may serve as the first textbook for what should become a new sub-discipline; call it Alimentary History I.” Tannahill continued, “And it came to pass. Since 1973 there has been unprecedented academic interest in the subject and a spate of books on different aspects of it.”  And whether you call it alimentary history, food history, or cooking history, for me it is completely fascinating.

In Savage Barbecue:Race, Culture, and the Invention of America's First Food, Andrew Warnes searches for the origin of barbecue and is alternately overly scholarly and very interesting, especially when he finds great quotes, like this one from journalist David Dudley: "Barbecue's appeal isn't hard to fathom and may explain why barbecue cookery seems such a Neanderthal corner of modern gastronomy.  It elegantly embraces several stereotypically Guy Things: fire building, beast slaughtering, fiddling with grubby mechanical objects, expensive gear fetishes, afternoon-long beer drinking, and, of course, great heaps of greasy meat at the end of the day.  Top this off with the frisson of ritual tribal warfare and you've got the mother of all male pastimes."

Another scholar, Richard Wrangham, in Catching Fire, tracks the origin of cooking over fire back to Homo erectus, the immediate precursor of Homo sapiens, some 1.8 million years ago.  This was about the time mankind first controlled fire, and he notes: "Effects of cooking include extra energy, softer food, fireside meals, and a more predictably food supply during periods of scarcity.  Cooking would therefore be expected to increase survival, especially of the vulnerable young.

Both books are highly recommended but with a warning that they tend to be quite academic in places.  Warnes is a Lecturer in American Literature and Culture at Leeds University in England and Wrangham is the Ruth Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University.


Diana Does It Again

Posted by: Dave DeWitt

Tagged in: history , fiery foods , books

Diana Kennedy

One of my favorite food authors is Diana Kennedy, the doenne of Mexican cooking despite the fact she's British. She's been eclipsed in the Mexican food field by multi-dimensional Rick Bayless, star of books, restaurants, products, and TV. But she's still down south of the border, researching, testing, and writing.

I first met Diana at a food event in Phoenix in the early '80s where we had booths next to each other. I was promoting Chile Pepper magazine and she was pushing her books like The Cuisines of Mexico. We engaged in spirited discussions, mostly about chile peppers and I really liked her. Then we were honored celebrity guests at the Fiery Foods Festival in Sydney in 2000 and I helped her with the set up of her cooking demo. Again, we hit it off.

I just received notice from the University of Texas Press that her new book will be out in September.  And it features my favorite part of Mexico: Oaxaca. I haven't seen it yet, but it looks terrific from the advance press materials.

Oaxaca al GustoOaxaca al Gusto: An Infinite Gastronomy

9.75 x 11.5 in.459 pp., 302 color photos, 12 color maps, 22 color drawings

ISBN: 978-0-292-72266-8.  $50.00, hardcover with dust jacket

Order it here.  Read more about it here.

 



 

 


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