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Heat Level - 3
In this recipe, the chicken absorbs the flavors of what it is simmered in. You can use hard taco shells for more traditional tacos if you wish.
The chutney is a nice and spicy accompaniment to the creamy taste of the scallops. We love habanero chiles in it, but use a serrano for less heat and a slightly different flavor. If you don’t have fresh coconut, substitute 1 ½ cups flaked coconut. Serve with lemon rice pilaf and grilled mango slices.
Here's another mulled cider that contains two chiles, the mild ancho and 
the super-hot habanero. The ancho adds the raisiny overtones while the
habanero supplies an additional fruity heat. Serve this cider in large
mugs around a roaring fire in the winter.
This is a Greek dish that is served as an appetizer with a loaf of French bread. The diners tear off pieces of the bread and spread the chiles and garlic over it. This dish has big, bold flavors, so it is not for the timid consumers.

The final result of this stuffed chile salad is the pleasantly contrasting flavors of the sweet stuffing, the smoky chiles, and the tangy vinaigrette. Piloncillo is unrefined, dark brown sugar that is sold in Mexico in cone shapes, and you can purchase it in Latin American markets.

 

All fresh green New Mexican chiles are great for stuffing, but we prefer Big Jims because they are so large. Fresh poblano chiles (a Mexican favorite) and even large jalapeños can also be used. Top the rellenos with either a red or green chile sauce before serving.
Chiles rellenos literally means "stuffed chiles," and in Mexico many different chiles are used, including poblanos, jalapeños, rocotos, and even fresh pasillas. Here in the Southwest, we prefer New Mexican green chiles. Whatever type of chile you use, the preparation and fillings are the same.
Chili historian Everett Lee DeGolyer was the owner of The Saturday Review of Literature, and was also, according to H. Allen Smith, "a world traveler, a gourmet, and the Solomon of the chili bowl." Here is the historian's recipe in his own words.

This pan-African soup is both cold and hot at the same time.  The chiles add the heat, and it is very refreshing in hot weather.  The chiles help to cool down the body.  Serve it as a first course with fresh bread.

So your thinking, "Hmmmm, what an interesting combination of stuff." Actually, this is a gorgeous salad that is both sweet and tart all at the same time. Note that this is also a time saver as we happily suggest you use one of the best inventions of the 90's--prewashed and chopped salad in a bag!
 

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