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Heat Level - 4
'This dish is wrapped in banana leaves, which give it a subtle, earthy flavor. Serve the dish with plain corn tamales, fresh corn tortillas or rice. '
This recipe calls for zucchini, but yellow squash or cucumber would work just as well.

The Texas Jersey Cheese Company, near LaGrange, Texas, makes 750 pounds of cheese a week. The star is a pepper Jack cheese (using large chunks of jalapeño chiles), and this is one of their star chile cheeserecipes.

Chiles and cumin combine here to create the olfactory essence of the Border. Most any type of small chile pepper that you can get in the bottle will work. Be sure to taste it often and remove the chiles when it reaches the desired heat--the longer the chiles are left in, the hotter the liquor will get!
Lemon grass makes a nice houseplant and a continuous supplier of lemony stalks–simply root a stalk in water and then plant it in a pot. Put it in partial sun and it will grow and separate. This marinade is excellent with chicken and fish. Warning: the marinade tastes so good your will want to drink it. Go ahead, call it lemon grass tea. Use this marinade for poultry, fish, or pork, or as a dressing for a salad. Dave serves it over noodles and calls it a pseudo-curry.

This recipe appears in the article "Sidekicks: Three Fun Barbecue Side Dishes from Mike
Stines" on the Burn! Blog. Read the story here.

This blend of hot chiles and fresh garden vegetables is known both north and south of the border as salsa fria, pico de gallo, salsa cruda, salsa fresca, salsa Mexicana, and salsa picante. No matter what it’s called, or what part of the Southwest it’s from, the Salsa with Six Names will always triumph over bottled salsas for the dipping of tostadas, as a taco sauce, or a relish for roasted or grilled meats. The key to proper preparation is to never use a food processor or blender. A marvelous consistency will be achieved by taking the time to chop or mince every ingredient by hand. This version of the salsa has more acidity and is designed to be processed in a water bath.

Named from ahuacatl "testicle" and mole, meaning “mixture,” this pulpy sauce moved from strictly Mexican use into America around 1900 and slowly increased in popularity as the avocado became more available in American supermarkets.  It really took off after the introduction of corn chips in the 1960s and now is found pre-made in various packages everywhere, but many of them are bland and lack the full flavor of guacamole made from scratch.  This version is traditionally made with a molcajete y mano, a large Mexican mortar and pestle carved from volcanic rock. If you don't have a molcajete y mano, you can smash the avocados with a fork or potato masher. From the article Avocado Madness!



This casserole has all the basics of tamales but is much easier to prepare. By varying the accompaniments, this dish can serve as a hearty dinner or a light luncheon. The combination of corn and beans is a good for vegetarians as it balances the protein to make them complete.

A table condiment to similar in appearance to ketchup--but much more
pungent--sriracha sauce is named after a seaside town in Thailand.
Increasingly popular, this sauce is found on the tables of Thai and
Vietnamese restaurants all over North America. Fresh red chiles are the
key to the flavor of this recipe.

 

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