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This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

 

The Tongue-Numbing "Flower Pepper" of Sichuan Province

by Kimberly Dukes

This is a quick and easy recipe that can be used as a marinade, dipping sauce, or as topping to grilled fish or poultry. I even use it as a flavoring in rice. If you are using the sauce for dipping after it’s been used as a marinade, for safety’s sake it must be simmered for 15 to 20 minutes before serving.

This is a great dish for vegetarians! Just make sure that you use vegetable broth, not chicken or beef stock.

Roasting the chicken along with the stuffing makes for an easy dinner. To complete the meal, cut zucchinis lengthwise and brush them with chile oil. Grill during the last 15 to 20 minutes of cooking, remove and sprinkle with grated Parmesan cheese.

In Fiji, this vegetarian side dish is made with lauki, a type of gourd. Use yellow squash or zucchini. Channa dhal is available in Asian or Indian markets.
A table condiment similar to ketchup--but much more pungent--sriracha sauce is named after a seaside town in Thailand. Increasingly popular, this sauce is found on the tables of Thai and Vietnamese restaurants all over North America. Fresh red chiles are the key to the flavor of this recipe.

This is the classic enchilada dish served at the early 1960s Albuquerque restaurant, Videz, owned by Pete Benavidez. The restaurant was torn down to make way for Interstate 40, but the recipe lives on. From the article Albuquerque's Food History is All About Chiles.

This intriguing dish violates at least two laws Americans have concerning steak: never season it heavily and never fry it in a pan. But since the taste of this steak is so remarkable, we'll forget the rules. Three varieties of pepper are recommended, but it works just fine using only coarsely crushed black peppercorns. Varying the hot sauce used can produce peppered steaks with intriguingly different flavors. Also, experiment by using brown, red, or rose peppercorns.
This intriguing dish violates at least two laws Americans have concerning steak: never season it heavily and never fry it in a pan. But since the taste of this steak is so remarkable, we'll forget the rules.
Variations on this famous Nigerian dish appear all over West Africa, including versions with game, fish, chicken, and vegtables.
 

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