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Difficulty - Challenging

Rick Browne, Ph.B., host of the PBS show “Barbecue America” and the author of The Best Barbecue on Earth and nine other books, is supplying articles and recipes to the Fiery Foods& Barbecue SuperSite.

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Garlic lovers, rejoice! Here is a perfect, garlicky accompaniment to the roasted turkey. And it’s so simple to prepare.

Find a butcher with pork bellies (a Chinese butcher probably has them on-hand; if not ask your butcher to order one for you). The ones I purchased from my purveyor had the rind (skin) removed and weighed about 11 pounds. I trimmed off some of the excess fat and cut the belly into four pieces about 2 3/4 pounds (or so) each. The trimmed pork fat makes great cracklings! Read more about making bacon in Mike Stines' article here.

While this roast could be prepared in an oven, smoking it over apple and cherry wood adds another dimension of flavor to complement the peppercorn and mustard glaze. A boneless pork loin could also be substituted for the bone-in sirloin roast. Serve with garlic mashed potatoes as pictured here. Note:  This entrée does require some advance preparation; be sure to read all the recipes before proceeding, as some of the steps are interrelated.

This recipe appears in Mike Stine's article "Outdoor Cooking: Not Just a Summer Pastime"

Why wouldn’t the cooks of the prehistoric, ash-covered village of Cerén 
in El Salvador have developed sauces to serve over meats and vegetables?
After all, there is evidence that curry mixtures were in existence
thousands of years ago in what is now India, and we have to assume that
Native Americans experimented with all available ingredients. Perhaps
this mole sauce was served over stewed duck meat, as ducks were one of
the domesticated meat sources of the Cerén villagers.

The ultimate fancy restaurant dessert is the soufflé. Who does these at home? They’re too hard to make and too fragile, right? Wrong. Remember, your BBQ is nothing more than an oven you’ve taken outdoors, whether you use charcoal, gas, or hardwood logs. If you can do it indoors, you can do it outdoors.

This dish truly amazes people. I even had a 4-star chef once bet me I couldn’t make a soufflé in a BBQ. He ended up eating one, and paying for my dinner that night, which included a soufflé that didn’t rise as high as mine. So there!

This is a style of smoking that hails from China’s Sichuan (formerly Szechuan) region, which is known for its hot, spicy cuisine. Serious Chinese food geeks may be familiar with Zhangcha duck—a tea-smoked Sichuan delicacy that’s tough to make but impressive as hell to anyone who’s never had it before. This is the recipe Mark Masker used for his experiment.  Read the entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

 

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