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Cooking Method - Fry
The final result of this stuffed chile salad is the pleasantly contrasting flavors of the sweet stuffing, the smoky chiles, and the tangy vinaigrette. Piloncillo is unrefined, dark brown sugar that is sold in Mexico in cone shapes, and you can purchase it in Latin American markets.
All fresh green New Mexican chiles are great for stuffing, but we prefer Big Jims because they are so large. Fresh poblano chiles (a Mexican favorite) and even large jalapeños can also be used. Top the rellenos with either a red or green chile sauce before serving.
Chiles rellenos literally means "stuffed chiles," and in Mexico many different chiles are used, including poblanos, jalapeños, rocotos, and even fresh pasillas. Here in the Southwest, we prefer New Mexican green chiles. Whatever type of chile you use, the preparation and fillings are the same.
There are as many versions of chorizo in Mexico and the Southwest as there are of enchiladas. Essentially, it is a hot and spicy sausage that is served with eggs for breakfast, as a filling for tostados or tacos, or mixed with refried beans. This Sonoran version is spicier than most, and, in addition, it is served crumbled rather than being formed into patties.
Even though this dish requires marinating overnight, the rest of the preparation is easy. It makes a spicy, fast meal, and you can fry it up and serve it at breakfast with eggs. Or, scramble some eggs, mix in the cooked chorizo, add shredded pepper jack cheese, and wrap in a tortilla for the best breakfast burrito you have ever tasted. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
These delicious sausages have a counterpart all over Latin America. The ingredients can vary widely; some recipes call for saltpeter, some use all pork, some include spices such as cloves and cinnamon, and still others prefer vinegar or wine. I have included this rather traditional recipe from Argentina utilizing the famed ají p-p, the "bad word" chile; for a substitute, use pure hot red chile powder, such as New Mexico Chimayó. In Argentina, these sausages are almost always included at an asado--a barbecue. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

This is a recipe I’ve used for years and years and it always works and is always wonderful. Traditionally these are prepared with cheese fillings, but a cooked meat mixture, or a combination of meat, dried fruits and nuts also works well. When I’m processing a large bag of chile, I always set aside the largest, whole chiles for this dish.

This recipe is from Fofo Voltaire of Caribbean Temptation, Inc.

Who would have imagined that mustard could spice up crab and do it so elegantly? Serve the crab cakes with homemade french fries and cole slaw.

 

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