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Cuisine - Mexican
This brick-red mole, courtesy of Restaurante El Naranjo, is made with chile ancho, sesame seeds and almonds.
Most people associate mole with the famous chocolate mole--mole poblano--but the word refers to both a mixture and a stew. No chocolate is used in this recipe, and with the exception of the potatoes and corn, this dish is quite similar to chili.
According to El Naranjo’s website, www.elnaranjo.com.mx, "The name is derived from the fact that this light sauce spills easy and stains tablecloths. It has a sweet flavor because of the pineapple and plantains."
Mole Negro sauce
colate Chile Sauce)

In an 1870s cookbook from Puebla there were recipes for 44 different moles but only one, Mole Poblano de Guajolote, or turkey in mole sauce, is called the National Dish of Mexico. This mole has descended from an Aztec chilemolli dish and although it’s called poblano, it doesn’t contain any poblano chiles. In this case poblano refers to the people of Puebla, birthplace of this dish. For an authentic taste, lard is used, but if that’s offensive to you, substitute vegetable oil.

Also, Mexican chocolate can be used, but if you do, be sure to eliminate the cinnamon from the recipe.

Use this sauce to accompany a variety of poultry dishes. Serve it in the traditional way, over a turkey breast, garnished with sesame seeds, or substitute sliced turkey, left over from your holiday feast. It also makes an excellent sauce for shredded turkey or chicken enchiladas.

Enchiladas prepared with mole sauce and Mexican asadero cheese, also called queso blanco, are as exotic as they are tasty. This is also a great way to utilize leftover turkey. Enchiladas are not difficult to prepare--in fact they are quite easy. The trick is to have everything organized and ready to go before assembling the enchiladas.

You can cook elk roasts quick and dry, like a beef tenderloin, or slow and moist, like a brisket. This recipe uses the slow and moist method with a spice rub that includes all the flavors of a Mexican Mole. Serve it with plenty of Negro Modelo beer. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
There are more than 60 varieties of chiles that are grown only in the state of Oaxaca and nowhere else in Mexico. We have suggested substitutions here to reflect varieties more commonly available north of the border. You can use oil instead of lard, but the flavor will change dramatically.
This is the legendary seventh mole from Oaxaca.
 

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