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Cuisine - Mexican
These slivered reddish gems are the perfect addition to every Mexican meal. Ophelia’s have the best flavor and crunch, and, though cebollas are intended to be condiments, her guests often find it difficult not to pile their tortillas full. Add slivered chiles, a little or a lot, for some heat.

This recipe was provided by author Kathy Gallantine. She collected it from Antonio Seja Torrez, a clam-picker in Baja. Every day at low tide, Antonio crawls through the mangroves and collects 500 pata de mula "clams," that are really mussels. He carries the several miles to the dock at Magdalena Bay, where he sells them for ten pesos apiece. His daily earnings come to about $2.00 U.S. "About enough to buy a kilo of beans," he says cheerfully. Try this recipe with true clams, but be prepared too pay a much higher price for them! Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.

This spicy ceviche from the southern Mexican state of Chiapas can be served on fresh greens for lunch or for a light dinner, accompanied by warm tortillas. Any of the fish substitutions will work equally as well in this dish. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation..

Everywhere that I’ve traveled in Mexico where there is an abundance of fresh seafood, there is an abundance of ceviche. This version, which I was served in a small restaurant in the seafood market in Cancun, is a variation of the more typical fish, onion, and chile ceviche.
This is a basic Mexican version of ceviche that is easily varied with the addition of fruits and vegetables that are in season. I like to add diced avocado, or jicama, or even cucumbers to add not only different flavors but also textures to the ceviche. By adding tomato juice and pulp to the recipe and serving in a large parfait glass, you transform the ceviche into the very popular, seafood cockteles found all over Mexico.
These sweet chicken chimichangas with fruit are lighter than the more traditional beef and bean recipe popular in Arizona.

This fiery shrimp appetizer recipe by Mike Stines appeared in the Burn! Blog here. Serve the shrimp with Baja Gazpacho for an unforgettable shrimp cocktail or just enjoy them straight off the grill.

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This is one of the most delicious Mexican coastal fish recipes. It is served in Veracruz, the area of Mexico most influenced by Spanish cooking, but is popular all over the country. Often the snapper is dusted with flour and pan fried, then covered with a sauce, but we prefer ours beach-style. We grill it over wood or natural charcoal (gas is acceptable, too) and then serve it with the sauce on the side. Charring the tomatoes on the grill adds a smoky dimension to the sauce. This elegant and colorful fish is served with white rice and additional pickled jalapeños.
The word capon translates as "castrated" but in this case merely means seedless. Yes, dried chiles such as anchos and pasillas can be stuffed, but they must be softened in hot water first. They have an entirely different flavor than their greener, more vegetable-like versions.

The final result of this stuffed chile salad is the pleasantly contrasting flavors of the sweet stuffing, the smoky chiles, and the tangy vinaigrette. Piloncillo is unrefined, dark brown sugar that is sold in Mexico in cone shapes, and you can purchase it in Latin American markets.

 

 

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