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n Mexico, all sauces are salsas, regardless of whether or not they are cooked. But in the U.S., a salsa usually refers to an uncooked sauce. This is one of the simplest--yet tastiest--uses of serrano chiles. Serve this as a dip for chips or as a marinade and basting sauce for grilled poultry and meat.
Here is one of the best methods for processing and preserving large quantities of small chile pods quickly. The way is so basic that it is sometimes overlooked among preservation methods. You should have a powerful blender or food processor for this. To use, defrost the cubes and estimate 2 to 3 pods per cube. Use in recipes calling for minced or chopped small chiles.

This recipe appeared in the article "Retro-Grilling" by Dr. BBQ, Ray Lampe. Learn more about Dr. BBQ on his website here. Many people don't realize that some salad dressings don't come from a jar.  In the spirit of authenticity, I am calling for iceberg lettuce here, but if you substituted romaine or spinach, I won't tell anyone.

Called pikantny syr (spicy cheese) in Russian, this is a popular appetizer in Siberia and the Russian Far East. This recipe and others can be found in the article Siberian Hot Stuff By Sharon Hudgins

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Charlie Butcher serves this sauce with fried alligator tail at Schooner’s Seafood House.

Yeah, right. Okay, this is our spin on Mexican flavorings that would work on goat, as in cabrito, pit roasted goat. Can’t find goat at Winn-Dixie? Use this rub for either grilling or smoking beef, pork, and lamb.

A Naga Jolokia Bloody Mary just sounds like manly fun and a great way to fire up a classic with hot new blood. This recipe features the Henry Family Farm Varietal Chile Extracts Ghost Pepper Extract made by David Rosengarten. This is a party-sized recipe suitable for a punchbowl. Read the entire article by Mark Masker here.

This Southwestern adaptation of the Italian specialty uses green chile and spinach in place of the traditional basil in the pesto. It has a very concentrated flavor—as do all pestos, so a little bit goes a long way. This pasta topper is also good on grilled meats or fish, burgers, and sandwiches.

These are very popular appetizers New Mexico and are served at just about every holiday party. A number of fillings can be used, but green chile cream cheese is by far the most favored. This is an all-purpose filling that goes well on crackers, as a dip with chips or vegetable crudities, as well as on tortillas. For those watching their fat intake, substitute light cream cheese or Neufchatel cheese. It is important to tightly roll and refrigerate the rolls or they won’t stay together after they are sliced..

Of course we have our own New Mexican version of pesto! It’s a topping for pasta but also can be added to soups, stews, and rice. Although we have specified cilantro in this recipes, you can use the traditional basil or even Italian parsley. Pecans, another New Mexican crop, can be substituted for the piñon nuts.

 

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