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Ingredient - Pork
Margaret Campos, who owns an organic chile farm and the Comida de Campos cooking school in Embudo, New Mexico, provided this recipe. Since the native chiles in northern New Mexico vary from one micro-region to the next, Campos says to use whatever you have on hand. She serves this green chile stew alone or with beans and a fresh tortilla.
There are as many versions of chorizo in Mexico and the Southwest as there are of enchiladas. Essentially, it is a hot and spicy sausage that is served with eggs for breakfast, as a filling for tostados or tacos, or mixed with refried beans. This Sonoran version is spicier than most, and, in addition, it is served crumbled rather than being formed into patties.
Here, as best I could reconstruct it, is the chile encrusted pork loin as served at De La Tierra. It is served with a "Barbecue Demi Glace" but they forgot to give me the recipe. So just make a gravy with the pan drippings and add some sherry and a little of your favorite barbecue sauce. Note that this recipe requires advance preparation.
Pasta is not only used by the Italians--remember that Marco Polo visited China and pasta was a favorite in China when he showed up. Since noodles are associated with a long and happy life they are always served at special occasions such as birthdays and New Year’s. These noodles can be served as an appetizer as well as with meats or roasts and the orange oil can be used in a variety of ways such as replacing unflavored oil in stir-frying.
Even though this dish requires marinating overnight, the rest of the preparation is easy. It makes a spicy, fast meal, and you can fry it up and serve it at breakfast with eggs. Or, scramble some eggs, mix in the cooked chorizo, add shredded pepper jack cheese, and wrap in a tortilla for the best breakfast burrito you have ever tasted. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
These delicious sausages have a counterpart all over Latin America. The ingredients can vary widely; some recipes call for saltpeter, some use all pork, some include spices such as cloves and cinnamon, and still others prefer vinegar or wine. I have included this rather traditional recipe from Argentina utilizing the famed ají p-p, the "bad word" chile; for a substitute, use pure hot red chile powder, such as New Mexico Chimayó. In Argentina, these sausages are almost always included at an asado--a barbecue. Note: This recipe requires advance preparation.
Don't ask me why, but it is essential to observe the sauteing and boiling times here. This is one of the favorite dishes in Cajun Country. We have spiced this recipe up a bit from its usual incarnation.
Pork is an inexpensive, flavorful and versatile meat that lends itself to a variety of preparations. This marinated and stuffed tenderloin is glazed with a spicy cranberry-habanero jelly and served with an apple compote, garlicky mashed potatoes and sugar snap peas. Tenderloins are packaged in pairs; this recipe uses both tenderloins and requires advance preparation.

Most barbecue cooks have their favorite dry rub recipe. This one is from the National Pork Producers Council. It calls for rinsing the rub off the ribs before cooking, a technique some cooks might choose not to use. The ribs can be rubbed and kept refrigerated for up to two days.

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:

The Heat of Competition: The Jack Daniels' Championship

 

This recipe and others can be found in the following article:
 
 

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