• The Fiery Foods and Barbecue Supersite
  • Recipe of the Day
  • All About Chiles
  • BBQ, Grilling & Smoking
  • Burn Blog
  • Videos
  • PodCast
  • Fiery Foods & BBQ Show
  • Scovie Awards
 Login / Logout

Keyword >
Cooking
Method >
Meal /
Course >
Ingredient >
Cuisine >
Heat Level >
Chile >






Cuisine - Vegetarian

"Do not let the pleasant taste fool you," warns Anne Marie, "it carries the kick of a mule!" She continues, "In case you drink up your supply and in your liquorized state find that you are having difficulty with the formula, this clever little rhyme will help you:

One of sour,

Two of sweet,

Three of strong,

And four of weak.

 

Believe it or not, the macadamia nut tree was first grown only for ornamental purposes. Thankfully, someone experimented with the nuts and discovered their butter-like, slightly sweet nature. This bread is so rich you won’t need to butter it.

This recipe appeared in the article Chile-Spiced Brunch Ideas for Mother's Day on the Burn! Blog.

You can substitute ground piquin, Santaka, or even habanero for the cayenne in this recipe.
This recipe is considered to be the basic one for beans that will be added to chili when it's served--assuming, of course, that you are a "with beans" aficionado. There is a great debate about whether or not to soak the beans overnight. The only simple answer is that if the beans are soaked overnight, they will take about half as long to cook the next day.

Here's a fun thing to grill this holiday: orange bell pepper Jack-O-Lanterns. You can fill 'em with all kinds of stuff but I use spiced up cream cheese (a) because it looks good in the pepper's face and (b) practically melts into a hot dip you can use for chips and the sliced pepper after its grilled. It's a very simple appetizer. Read the entire article on the Burn! Blog here.

This candy recipe makes good use of the syrup created as a byproduct when making candied chiles. Depending on the chiles used, the syrup can get pretty hot. Typically it has a consistency somewhere between corn syrup and molasses and looks clear, lightly tinted.

This recipe is from the classic vegetarian cookbook for chileheads: Hot & Spicy & Meatless 2, Hot & Spicy & Meatless 2by Dave DeWitt, Mary Jane Wilan, and Melissa T. Stock. Order a copy here. In this recipe, we combine not only a vegetable but also a fruit and a few well-chosen chiles. Use fresh blueberries when available, although frozen berries will work as well. From the article Blazing Blueberries.

The blue corn gives these pancakes are a refreshing change from the ordinary, and habanero in the honey will warm Mom’s heart.

This recipe appeared in the article Chile-Spiced Brunch Ideas for Mother's Day on the Burn! Blog.

Blue Corn, native to the Southwest, gives these tamales a distinctive, nutty taste. Make them smaller than an entree tamale and serve as a side dish in place of a vegetable. This recipe is taken from Just North of the Border, by Dave DeWitt and Nancy Gerlach. Prima Publishing, 1992.

The sweetness of the blueberries in this recipe is enhanced by the heat from the biscuits. You may use other fruit fillings, but fresh blueberries work the best. This recipe was developed by SuperSite Food Editor Emily DeWitt-Cisneros. From the article Blazing Blueberries.

 

Featured Rapid Recipe



Copyright© 1997-2014, Sunbelt Shows, Inc.
No portion of this site may be reproduced in any medium
without the written permission of the copyright holder.